Chester History

Chester

Chester was founded as a "castrum", or Roman fort, with the name Deva Victrix in 79AD by the Roman Legio II Adiutrix during the reign of the Emperor Vespasian. Chester's four main roads, Eastgate, Northgate, Watergate and Bridge, follow routes laid out at this time – almost 2,000 years ago. One of the three main Roman army bases, Deva later became a major settlement in the Roman province of Britannia. After the Romans left in the 5th century, the Saxons fortified the town against the Danes and gave Chester its name. The patron saint of Chester, Werburgh, is buried in the Cathedral.

Chester was one of the last towns in England to fall to the Normans during the Norman conquest of England. William the Conqueror ordered the construction of a castle, to dominate the town and the nearby Welsh border. In 1071, he created Hugh d'Avranches, the 1st Earl of Chester.